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Macon’s Cherry Blossom Festival Needs More Japanese Influence

tsurmai3

By Alan Wood, March 8, 2015

Editor of Georgia Watchdog

hanami-croppedAs Macon’s cherry blossom festival fast approaches on March 19, I’m reminded of the connection to Japan that inspired this festival.  Our festival, which includes 10 festival days spread over 19 calendar days ending April 4, is a major undertaking.  It fairly qualifies as Macon’s single biggest and most ambitious event.

Macon has more cherry blossom trees than even Washington D.C., which has a famous, much larger festival of its own, also beginning in full swing this year on March 19 and extending until April 18.  During that same period, Macon often can count on better weather — but we can also count on a limited connection with the Japanese origins of the festival, a link that Washington’s National Cherry Blossom Festival plays up big.  Washington even  goes so far as to call its festival alternatively by the Japanese name, Sakura Matsuri.

Having spent many years in Japan, I can see opportunities for using our festival to pay more homage to Japan, while enhancing the Japanese flair and vitality of our festival, much as D.C. does with its parallel festival.  The Japan-America Society of Georgia, for example, not to mention our major local Japanese-owned employer, YKK, might be recruited to assist us in adding more genuine Japanese culture, activities and verve.  We need it.  Despite nice fresh features like the biergarten event this coming Thursday,  Macon’s festival in other respects has gone a bit flat.

Some Japanese Cherry-Blossom Basics

In Japanese, the word cherry is Sakura, and festival is Matsuri, so combine those words for Sakura Matsuri, pronounced Sa-koo-rah Mot-soo-ree. The Japanese also have a word for the viewing of the cherry blossoms called Hanami. (Hah-na-mee), which literally means flower viewing.  They even have a cherry blossom forecast on weather reports. The blossom forecast (sakurazensen, literally cherry blossom front) is announced each year by the national weather bureau, and is watched carefully by those planning hanami, as the blossoms only last a week or two.

Japan is a relatively small country that could fit entirely inside California, but it also stretches very far in the north from Hokkaido, to as far south as Okinawa. That’s a distance of 1,896 miles, meaning blossoms can begin in late March in warmer areas, and last until early May in the cooler north.

tsurumai2Unlike in Macon, most people in Japanese cities don’t have large yards with the opportunity for an abundance of their own cherry trees. Instead, there are large parks and temple grounds where people congregate near cherry trees while in bloom. People will go very early in the morning to claim a prime spot with a large blue tarp. Usually a young or new employee from a company is sent to grab a place the day before for the office crowd and guard it all day before the rest of the crew arrive after work.

You’ll see groups of students, some families, and also a lot of coworkers from the same section at a company. Then after work, the party starts as everyone arrives with food and drink. Celebrations will last literally as long as the blossoms remain on the trees. At most major Hanami venues, all the trees will be lit up so, the parties can last all night long.  People sometimes leave in the early morning, heading straight to work. There are lots of public baths where people can shower and change clothes on the way. Many people get very little sleep this time of the year.  The Japanese may seem a little reserved — but not during cherry blossom time, when the delicate beauty of the cherry blossoms seems to delight the Japanese sensibility like a powerful elixir.

Cherry Blossoms and the Japanese School Year

IFThe Japanese school year and system are both similar to and different from  from the U.S. year and system.  Their  primary schools correspond to our grades 1-6, with junior high covering grades 7-9, and high school, grades 10-12.  But the Japanese school year begins in April, not August, as in Bibb.  The first term runs from April 1 to around July 20, when summer vacation begins.

The Japanese start their school year in the spring because they view spring as … Continue Reading

Dry Run for the Doggie Death Penalty? The First “Dangerous Dog” Hearing is Underway Before Macon-Bibb’s Board of Health, With a Verdict Expected Monday Evening, March 9, 2015. Even After the Verdict, There’ll Be Lots of Questions Left to Answer.

2015-03-04 18.38.03

By Dave Oedel, March 8, 2015, Macon, Georgia:

On December 29, 2014, three dogs, Coco, Pearl and Justice, pit bull mixes, got out of a contained backyard in the Brookefield subdivision off Bowman Road in north Macon at 140 Brookefield Drive, apparently from a hole in the high board fence that is typical in the neighborhood. Walking in the neighborhood was a visitor to the subdivision from Miami, Florida. His name? Renalto, an eight-year-old Schnauzer. At the end of a brief, frenzied encounter among the four dogs, Renalto was dead.

Renalto’s owner, Claudio Naranjo, 38, visiting her friends Zarina and Tora Gore who live at 304 Millwood Court just around the corner and about five doors away, was injured with bite punctures to her hand while trying to separate the dogs. Some of the punctures on one hand received stitches. … Continue Reading

Is Macon Really on the Move?

By Alan Wood

Editor of Georgia Watchdog

When I chose the title for this article, I thought I’d give my opinion, support it with some facts, and that’d be the end of it. But once I started thinking more deeply about the subject, I realized this is quite a complex topic, with lots of facets and nuances. You’d need to look at employment, population growth, shopping, attractions, education, culture, tourism, entertainment, crime, and dozens of other issues to really be able to fully delve into trying to answer this question.

So instead, this article will serve more as an introduction to the question of whether Macon is “on the move” or not. In this first edition of the series, I plan to talk first about some personal memories of Macon some decades ago, and a bit later about something called urban scaling — as well as what Macon can learn from some real historical antecedents, ancient cities.

… Continue Reading

Why Did Maher Do Macon? Looking Back on Maher’s Macon Performance, and Why He Really Came

Craig Hicks' Facebook Post Quoting Bill Maher in 2012

By Dave Oedel

On February 10, 2015, Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, executed three fine, promising Muslim Americans, Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, 21, Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, 19, and Yusor’s husband, Deah Shaddy Barakat, 23, in a Chapel Hill, North Carolina apartment complex. It was partly over a parking dispute, but probably also because of Hicks’ anti-Muslim, anti-religion rage.

Three days before the North Carolina massacre, Bill Maher made a surprising appearance 400 miles away in Macon, Georgia, before about 1,500 people at Macon’s City Auditorium. Attending Maher’s Macon show were people from all over the southeast, including some from the Chapel Hill area, because Maher scheduled only two southeastern performances this year. One, on February 8, 2015, in a fancy, big Orlando theater, was predictable. More eye-opening was Maher’s choice of a tired Macon venue on February 7. … Continue Reading

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