Recent Articles:

Opinion: Why Georgia’s Cautious Approach to Marijuana Legalization Makes Sense

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By Dave Oedel

Georgia’s legislators have gotten some heat from advocates for marijuana legalization for not having gone farther than the nine categories of ailments for which an oil distillate of marijuana will now become legal in Georgia. Allen Peake, a Macon-Bibb delegate to Georgia’s General Assembly, led the effort to pass Haleigh’s Hope Act, H.B. 1, this session. Some commenters, though, have taken the legislators to task for not having done more.

The bizarre postures that some states find themselves in after rushing into relatively wholesale legalization of marijuana, however, suggest that Georgia was wise to take a relatively cautious approach.

Consider the case of … Continue Reading

Allen Peake Talks About Medical Marijuana and More

Allen Peake

The Monitor caught up with Georgia state representative Allen Peake, R-Macon, bright and early at 5:30 a.m. on March 26, 2015 as Peake was driving up to Atlanta for a television interview about one of the most talked-about pieces of legislation coming out of Atlanta this year, H.B. 1, Haleigh’s Hope Act. The act will provide for state-law-legal use in Georgia of low-THC cannabinoid oil, an extract of marijuana. Governor Nathan Deal is expected to sign the bill quickly.

Monitor: Congratulations on getting the 160-1 victory in the House yesterday accepting the Senate’s amendment the day before that largely endorsed your bill by a 48-6 vote. Low-THC CBD oil will now become legal in Georgia for eight medical uses. How does it feel for you as the primary steward of this legislation? … Continue Reading

Brick Art in Washington Park: Artists in the Public Realm

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By Jack L. Sammons, March 26, 2015, Macon Georgia:

Mr. Roscoe Ross is a master brick mason specializing in historic restorations. His family has practiced this form of masonry in Macon, and around the country, for one hundred and twenty-three years. Any historic brick restoration work you see as you drive down College Street is likely to have been done by Mr. Ross. About a week ago, he completed work on the restorations of the main stairs and walkway in Washington Park, the most dramatic improvement to that park in at least forty years. A few days ago, the city wisely authorized an extension of his work on the walkway down to the lower stairs.

Even a casual observer of brick work can see that Mr. Ross’ work is exceptional. The corners are crisp, the lines straight, the bricks perfectly selected, the mortar work finely done: appropriately pointed, and with the width of the mortar carefully adjusted to fit particular locations and functions. Each of the recycled and well-worn bricks of the walkway was cleansed by hand, and then turned so that its previous face was now down.

Mr. Roscoe Ross, Brick Mason, standing on the walk he is restoring at Washington Park in Macon, Georgia, March, 2015

Mr. Roscoe Ross, Brick Mason, standing on the walk he is restoring at Washington Park in Macon, Georgia, March, 2015

In order to do all this well, the brick mason must be initiated … Continue Reading

Japan May Offer A Way Forward For Better Community Policing in Bibb County

A police box in Ueno Park

By Alan Wood,

Editor of Georgia Watchdog

In the U.S., police activity is mostly centered around the patrol car. In downtown Macon you occasionally see officers on bicycles, segways, or on foot,  but in most parts of Bibb county they use squad cars for patrols. In Japan the center of police activity happens in a very small police station called a koban.
Police boxes  are ubiquitous throughout Japan, and practically every populated neighborhood or community has one. There are different versions depending on urban or rural areas, but if you include both types, there are approximately 6,600 kobans in cities and around 9,000 chuzaishos in rural areas. The main difference is … Continue Reading

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